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Why long lines to vote in the Arizona primary could qualify as voter suppression


If you've already voted in the primaries, did you have to wait in line? How long? If it was long, did you give up and go home?

The good news is that turnout in a lot of primaries so far has been pretty good. The downside of that is that people are having to wait, sometimes a really long time. To the point where people are worrying about voter suppression.

Take, for example, yesterday's primary in Arizona. Some voters there waited in line for hours partly because of a ridiculously small number of polling stations.

Why so few polling stations?

One Arizona county reduced the number of polling places to save money, which led to one site per every 21,000 voters. That's pretty bad considering most other counties had an average of about 2,500 or fewer voters per polling site.

And they say some areas with large Latino populations got the short shrift--either no polling place at all, or one. That's why people are calling it voter suppression. (Not voter fraud--that's different, like when results are faked or ballots aren't counted.)

Activists are literally demanding an investigation.

They think the long waits kept people from going to the polls or made them give up and leave before they voted.

What's more, Hillary Clinton was declared the Democratic winner soon after the polls closed--while thousands of people were still waiting in line to vote. That is wrong. (Can we please stop calling races so early?)

Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running against Clinton, called the whole thing "a disgrace":

"In the United States of America, democracy is the foundation of our way of life. And what happened in Arizona is a disgrace. I hope that every state in this country learns from that and learns how to put together a proper election where people can come in and vote in a timely manner and go back to work."

Do you think what happened in Arizona was voter suppression?

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Why long lines to vote in the Arizona primary could qualify as voter suppression

Christina Buff

Christina is a freelance writer from a tiny town in Southern Maryland who just can't seem to figure out whether others are being sarcastic or not. She has a degree in business communication, with a focus in writing, from Stevenson University, and has written things for Severna Park Voice, Maryland Film Festival, The Villager, and Hello Giggles. Follow her on twitter @tinaBUFF where she constantly overthinks her tweets, or read her medley of musings at touchinfinity.wordpress.com.

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